CLMR

ashleigh
us and austria-based
20-something student

"We are only human, and the gods have fashioned us for love.
That is our great glory, and our great tragedy."
(GRRM)

a nsfw blog.

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90377:

DSC02761 by liuted1970 on Flickr.

90377:

DSC02761 by liuted1970 on Flickr.

15 hours ago 9,603 notes via jumentum © prvails

kawaiilluminatii:

when people bring up your past

image

1 day ago 28,414 notes via kawaiilluminatii
de-preciated:

Fallen (by nicholsphotos)
Day Four: Hiking through old-growth forest on the north side of Douglas Island. This is the largest undisturbed old-growth forest in North America.

de-preciated:

Fallen (by nicholsphotos)
Day Four: Hiking through old-growth forest on the north side of Douglas Island. This is the largest undisturbed old-growth forest in North America.
I want to make you feel so fucking happy that you forget every bit of sad in you

Nahilliam Truspear   (via coldflowers)
1 day ago 246,169 notes via veleslava © truornah

I AM SO FUCKING SICK OF THE NOTION THAT ONLY THOSE WHO DON’T WANT POWER ARE DESERVING OF IT.

Occasionally it works out, fine, but someone who doesn’t have a passion for leadership is going to do very poorly at the top. Because that shit’s hard, it is ungodly hard, and only if you’re truly committed to it are you going to be any good at it. Someone who just accidents their way into it is going to drop the ball, not to mention the fact that they haven’t prepared themselves for the task, so they’re untrained and untried.

Ambition is not a bad thing. Ambition for power is not a bad thing. Being ruthless and cutthroat and amoral, sure, but not ambitious.

And yet again and again and again and again and again I see books where only the person who doesn’t want the job is considered good enough to have it. And I think it’s born out of this idea that ambition is evil, but at the same time they need to be in charge for the story to work, so we end up with this fucking trope that is literally the opposite of sense-making.


1 day ago 511 notes via skogsdjur © mrsalenko

lying under a tree at hochosterwitz and picnicking at the riversmeet

1 day ago 8 notes © falkenna

my mother sent me updates of how my garden is going while i’m on vacation.. eee

3 days ago 21 notes © falkenna
probablyasocialecologist:

How Existing Cropland Could Feed Billions More
Hoang Su Phi terraced fields, Ha Giang province, Vietnam. Image: hoangtran / Fotolia

Feeding a growing human population without increasing stresses on Earth’s strained land and water resources may seem like an impossible challenge. But according to a new report by researchers at the University of Minnesota’s Institute on the Environment, focusing efforts to improve food systems on a few specific regions, crops and actions could make it possible to both meet the basic needs of 3 billion more people and decrease agriculture’s environmental footprint.
The report, published today in Science, focuses on 17 key crops that produce 86 percent of the world’s crop calories and account for most irrigation and fertilizer consumption on a global scale. It proposes a set of key actions in three broad areas that that have the greatest potential for reducing the adverse environmental impacts of agriculture and boosting our ability meet global food needs. For each, it identifies specific “leverage points” where nongovernmental organizations, foundations, governments, businesses and citizens can target food-security efforts for the greatest impact. The biggest opportunities cluster in six countries — China, India, U.S., Brazil, Indonesia and Pakistan — along with Europe.


Continue reading
Further reading:
Agrivoltaics - Farming food and fuel, side by side
Farmers Need To Get ‘Climate Smart’ To Prep For What’s Ahead
Family Farmers Hold Keys to Agriculture in a Warming World
Climate change will reduce crop yields sooner than we thought

probablyasocialecologist:

How Existing Cropland Could Feed Billions More

Hoang Su Phi terraced fields, Ha Giang province, Vietnam. Image: hoangtran / Fotolia

Feeding a growing human population without increasing stresses on Earth’s strained land and water resources may seem like an impossible challenge. But according to a new report by researchers at the University of Minnesota’s Institute on the Environment, focusing efforts to improve food systems on a few specific regions, crops and actions could make it possible to both meet the basic needs of 3 billion more people and decrease agriculture’s environmental footprint.

The report, published today in Science, focuses on 17 key crops that produce 86 percent of the world’s crop calories and account for most irrigation and fertilizer consumption on a global scale. It proposes a set of key actions in three broad areas that that have the greatest potential for reducing the adverse environmental impacts of agriculture and boosting our ability meet global food needs. For each, it identifies specific “leverage points” where nongovernmental organizations, foundations, governments, businesses and citizens can target food-security efforts for the greatest impact. The biggest opportunities cluster in six countries — China, India, U.S., Brazil, Indonesia and Pakistan — along with Europe.

sweetlycaon said: can i reblog this for people to see? :o)

I swear up and down that I never saw this until now (just browsing my old posts mindlessly). I’m sorry! Yes, of course, though I suppose it’s beside the point now as I’m unable to send them because of travel. Thank you for trying to boost it, though! I’ll probably try again when I get back.